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Hartford Changemakers

Black, Latinx, and Indigenous leaders in Hartford History

Mary Johnson

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Mary Johnson (center), with Elizabeth R. Morris and Rosa J. Fisher
Colored Women's Liberty Loan Committee, October 21, 1917
RG012, State Archives, Connecticut State Library

Mary A. Johnson (Parker) (1881-1959)

Business Owner, Social Services & Recreation Organizational Leader

Johnson was born in Strasburg, Virginia in 1881 and came to Hartford with her husband Sydney Johnson in 1916. She and her husband co-owned the only Black-owned funeral services company in the state of Connecticut at the time. She was the embalmer. She co-founded the Colored Women's League in 1917 and was its president. The Women's League originally operated out of building on Avon Street and also operated out of Washington Street and Main Street as part of a multi-group, Black-owned Colored Realty Corporation building. She registered to vote, among a handful of Black women, in October of 1920. Through her and her organization's work, she supported new arrivals from the South and European immigrants integrate into city social and religious life. The Colored Women's League is what we know today as the Women's League Child Development Center on Main Street in the North End of Hartford.


Propietaria de Negocio, Líder Organizacional de Servicios Sociales y Recreación

Johnson nació en Strasburg, Virginia en 1881 y llegó a Hartford con su esposo Sydney Johnson en 1916. Ella y su esposo eran copropietarios de la única compañía de servicios funerarios propiedad de Black en el estado de Connecticut en ese momento. Ella era la embalsamadora. Ella cofundó la Liga de Mujeres de Color en 1917 y fue su presidenta. La Liga de Mujeres originalmente operaba fuera del edificio en Avon Street y también operaba en Washington Street y Main Street como parte de un edificio de varios grupos, propiedad de Black Realty Corporation. Se inscribió para votar, entre un puñado de mujeres negras, en octubre de 1920. Mediante su trabajo y el de su organización, apoyó a los recién llegados del Sur y los inmigrantes europeos se integraron en la vida social y religiosa de la ciudad. La Liga de Mujeres de Color es lo que hoy conocemos como el Centro de Desarrollo Infantil de la Liga de Mujeres en Main Street, en el extremo norte de Hartford.


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